An exhibit entitled “Mattia Corvino e Firenze. Arte e umanesimo alla corte del re di Ungheria” inside the library of San Marco is an opportunity to see some luscious Renaissance illuminated manuscripts from Florentine as well as Hungarian collections.

S. Girolamo, Cod. Lat. 930, fol. 1r: Commentaria in Sacram Scripturam

Matthias Corvinus was king of Hungary from 1458 to 1490. Like Lorenzo “il Magnifico” in Florence, Corvinus was a Humanist, and the two are considered “united by their diplomatic ties [and] their shared personal passion for the ancient and modern knowledge to be found in books housed, in turn, in libraries famous also for their beauty,” says Cristina Acidini.

For those who weren’t aware – and I certainly was not – 2013 is the “Italian culture in Hungary and of Hungarian culture in Italy,” so, following an idea of Acidini, the exhibition was jointly developed by Hungarian and Florentine scholars: Péter Farbaky, an art historian and the deputy director of the Budapest History Museum, Dániel Pócs, an art historian with the Academy of Science’s Art History Institute, Eniko Spekner, a historian, and András Végh,an archaeologist, both with the Budapest History Museum, and Magnolia Scudieri and Lia Brunori, the director and deputy director respectively of the Museo di San Marco.

Through manuscripts as well as small sculptures and objects commissioned by the Hungarian king, the exhibit shows the spread of Florentine humanist culture and art in Hungary, using loans from Hungarian and other European collections. I reproduce here the most beautiful of the manuscripts in the show.

Michael Wolgemuth (Norimberga, 1434-1519) – Wilhelm Pleydenwurff (Norimberga, 1460 ca.-1494) View of the city of Florence Woodcut on paper Firenze, Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale
Michael Wolgemuth (Norimberga, 1434-1519) – Wilhelm Pleydenwurff (Norimberga, 1460 ca.-1494) View of the city of Buda, 1490 ca Woodcut on paper Firenze, Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale
Tito Livio, De rebus Romanorum ab urbe condita Manuscript Munich, Bayerische Staatsbibliothek
Tetraeuangelion di Giano Pannonio, Costantinopoli, secc. X-XI
Gian Francesco Marliani (1480 – 1524), Epitalamion Manuscript dated 1488; illustrated by Ambrogio de’Predis and possibly Leonardo da Vinci Volterra, Biblioteca Guarnacci
Sant’Agostino, Sermones, secunda pars Manuscript, circa 1475; illustrated by Attavante, post 1490 Firenze, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana
Bible, circa 1485-1490; miniatures by Gherardo and Monte di Giovanni, 1489-1490 Firenze, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana
Bible, circa 1485-1490; miniatures by Gherardo and Monte di Giovanni, 1489-1490 Firenze, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana
Sant’Agostino, letters Manuscript, circa 1490, with miniatures by Gherardo and Monte di Giovanni, 1490-1492 Firenze, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana
St. Bernard, Sermons Manuscript, circa 1491, with miniatures by Giovanni Boccardi detto Boccardino il Vecchio, 1491-1492 Firenze, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana
Claudio Tolomeo, Cosmographia Manuscript, Florentine, circa 1476-1480; illustrated by Francesco Rosselli, Attavante and Piero del Massaio Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France

 

Exhibit information

Mattia Corvino e Firenze. Arte e umanesimo alla corte del re di Ungheria
Biblioteca Monumentale, Museo di San Marco, Firenze
October 10 2013 – January 6 2014

See website for details

All photos reproduced with permission, distributed to the press. Please do not reproduce these images but contact the press office of Un anno ad arte for usage.

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